The Golden Age of Hollywood

Erin Shaffer's Comments

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At 1:02pm on April 7, 2017, Rosie Sayer said…

I'm glad your comments are still there in the Game! When did you get married?

At 9:49am on March 28, 2017, Rosie Sayer said…

Erin, I checked the Screwball Comedy group to look up your old handle, but your account was definitely deleted, because all your comments are gone. A sad loss for all of us!

At 12:37am on March 20, 2017, Ktrek said…

Erin,

Sorry that your former account doesn't exist. Could you have possibly used a different email address and user name? I searched the database and your email does not exist except under your current account. If you used a handle it might still exist. I just don't know where to look. The only accounts we have deleted were ones that were inactive for five years or more.

At 6:32pm on March 13, 2017, kareng said…

Welcome Erin.  Enjoy!  :D  Feel free to pop around to The Game I Play, and join the fun.  We're doing 'Movies with a Sports theme' at the moment.  Cheers!  kareng.

At 11:31am on March 13, 2017, Ktrek said…

Erin, Welcome to The Golden Age of Hollywood. I hope you enjoy our site.

Kevin

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TCM Blog

This Land is Your Land: The Southerner (1945)

To view The Southerner click here. Jean Renoir considered The Southerner (1945) to be his “only work of a personal nature carried out in Hollywood.” Adapted from the National Book Award winning novel Hold Autumn in Your Hand, by George Sessions Perry, it follows a year in the life of a struggling Texas tenant farmer and his family. A lyrical portrait of do-it-yourself […]

The Man Ray Movie Challenge: Caesar and Cleopatra (1945)

To view Caesar and Cleopatra click here. In 1951, surrealist artist Man Ray, who was a fan of the cinema, quipped, “The worst films I have ever seen, the ones that put me to sleep, contain ten or fifteen marvelous minutes. The best films I have ever seen only contain ten or fifteen worthwhile ones.” […]

Shoot First, Die Later (1974)

To view Shoot First, Die Later click here. Here’s how I’d pitch Fernando Di Leo’s Shoot First, Die Later (1974) to any of my friends: If you’d like to see a gritty Italian crime movie that evokes The French Connection (1971) and surely influenced Martin Scorsese and Quentin Tarantino, look no further than this grim […]

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