The Golden Age of Hollywood

Classic Movie Night Recommendation: Double Indemnity (1944)

Double Indemnity (1944)

Friday, June 21st  

11:15PM (ET)

Insurance salesman Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray) unsuspectingly drops by a client’s house to renew a policy for car insurance and is quickly ensnared into a murder plot with Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck).  Neff seemingly equally motivated by the prospects of being with Phyllis and wanting to pull off the perfect crime to scam the company maneuvers through much of the film fooling the best claims investigator in the business and his friend, Barton Keyes (Edward G. Robinson).  Though Neff has always been honest, he is not exactly an upstanding individual seeming to involve himself with cheap women and Phyllis fit this type.  From their first meeting the characters dialogue shows their dance with each other, each trying to get what they want from the other.  Phyllis wants to murder her husband, and Neff wants Phyllis.

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