The Golden Age of Hollywood

This is indeed a sad day for all of us fans of Turner Classic Movies as we say good bye to legendary film historian, the face and voice of TCM, Robert Osborne. Robert generated true warmth, wit, and charm like a favorite uncle who would come into our homes and delight us all with his encyclopedic knowledge of behind the scenes facts, anecdotes, and trivia about the greatest films of Hollywood's Golden Era. Robert's passion was the movies, and the joy they brought to other movie fans both young and old alike. He was truly loved and embraced by his many fans and friends for his calming presence, compassion, friendly demeanor, and gentlemanly style that catapulted him into a world class host. We will still watch TCM, but it won't be the same without our favorite film scholar introducing our beloved movie classics and giving insightful closing remarks after the film in that cheerful resonant voice. Robert, we will dearly miss you and hope to see you at "the after party". Rest In Peace.

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