The Golden Age of Hollywood

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silent horror

this group is dedicated to the lesser known silent horror movies

Members: 32
Latest Activity: Sep 20, 2015

THE MAN WHO LAUGHS, 1928

Discussion Forum

Horrors for Halloween

Started by Dave Miller Oct 27, 2013. 0 Replies

Eerie Tales (1919)

Started by Dave Miller Oct 23, 2013. 0 Replies

Diggin' Up Drakula?

Started by Michael Feb 27, 2011. 0 Replies

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Comment by Dave Miller on September 20, 2015 at 5:29pm

Midnight Faces, 1926 is now playing

Comment by Dave Miller on November 20, 2014 at 4:35pm

THE MAN WHO LAUGHS, 1928

Comment by Dave Miller on October 20, 2013 at 12:10pm
THE MANY FACES OF DRACULA – MAX SCHRECK - One of the first film adaptations of Stoker's story caused Stoker's estate to sue for copyright infringement. In 1922, silent film director F. W. Murnau made a horror film called Nosferatu: eine Symphonie des Grauens ("Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror"), which took the story of Dracula and set it in Transylvania and Germany. In the story, Dracula's role was changed to that of Count Orlok, played by Max Schreck. The Stoker estate won its lawsuit, and all existing prints of Nosferatu were ordered destroyed. However, a number of pirated copies of the movie survived to the present era, where they entered the public domain.
THE MANY FACES OF DRACULA – MAX SCHRECK - One of the first film adaptations of Stoker's story caused Stoker's estate to sue for copyright infringement. In 1922, silent film director F. W. Murnau made a horror film called Nosferatu: eine Symphonie des Grauens ("Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror"), which took the story of Dracula and set it in Transylvania and Germany. In the story, Dracula's role was changed to that of Count Orlok, played by Max Schreck. The Stoker estate won its lawsuit, and all existing prints of Nosferatu were ordered destroyed. However, a number of pirated copies of the movie survived to the present era, where they entered the public domain.
Comment by Dave Miller on October 20, 2013 at 12:05pm
Conrad Veidt & Lil Dagover, THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI (Robert Wiene, 1920)
Conrad Veidt & Lil Dagover, THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI (Robert Wiene, 1920)
Comment by Dave Miller on October 20, 2013 at 12:03pm
Rare photograph of stage actor Max Schreck from 1922, the year he became NOSFERATU on the screen.
Rare photograph of stage actor Max Schreck from 1922, the year he became NOSFERATU on the screen.
Comment by diane on October 3, 2013 at 7:26pm

Just saw "The Golem" a week or so back. Completely

knocked out by the stylized sets and the amazing makeup

and facial expressions of Paul Wegener. Everything was

just breathtaking.

Comment by Dave Miller on May 4, 2013 at 10:37pm

The Haunted Castle, 1896, Georges Melies

Comment by Dave Miller on April 27, 2013 at 8:46am
In 1922, ten years after Bram's death, the landmark case was filed, Florence Stoker vs Prana Films/FW Murnau for breach of copyright, as the film was clearly a pirated version of Bram's novel (even advertised as being taken from Dracula)
an advertisement for a summer movie from Cinea magazine {July 1922}
an advertisement for a summer movie from Cinea magazine {July 1922}
Source: Apocalyptic Midnight Death Cult (Facebook)
Comment by Dave Miller on April 17, 2013 at 9:34am
Behind The Scenes:
Behind The Scenes:
Comment by Dave Miller on April 4, 2013 at 10:07am
German actor Max Schreck (1879 – 1936) played vampire Count Orlok in F.W. Murnau’s silent horror film, NOSFERATU (1922). Schreck is pictured without makeup to the left of Orlok in this photo. It has been written that Murnau found Schreck "strikingly ugly" in real life and decided the vampire makeup would suffice with just pointy ears and false teeth.
German actor Max Schreck (1879 – 1936) played vampire Count Orlok in F.W. Murnau’s silent horror film, NOSFERATU (1922). Schreck is pictured without makeup to the left of Orlok in this photo. It has been written that Murnau found Schreck "strikingly ugly" in real life and decided the vampire makeup would suffice with just pointy ears and false teeth.
Source: The Old Movie Guy's Page, Facebook
 

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