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TCM Blog

StreamLine Has Moved to Tumblr!

On November 1, 2017 FilmStruck’s blog, StreamLine, moved to Tumblr. This archive will remain active for anyone looking to access older content, but going forward our daily posts dedicated to cinema will appear on FilmStruck’s Tumblr page. See the the link below to be redirected to our new location. http://filmstruck.tumblr.com/tagged/streamline-blog  

Affairs of the Heart: The Wedding Night (1935)

To view The Wedding Night click here. The Wedding Night was doomed from the start. It was producer Samuel Goldwyn’s final attempt at making the Ukrainian actress Anna Sten into a Garbo-level star, and his persistence had become something of a Hollywood joke. The Wedding Night became known around town as “Goldwyn’s Last Sten,” but […]

Murnau and the Phantoms of Germany

To view Phantom click here. It’s that time of year when Nosferatu (1922), F.W. Murnau’s interpretation of Dracula, appears on lists of recommended horror films. The oldest, existing film version of Bram Stoker’s novel, Nosferatu is likely Murnau’s most watched title. It’s eerie Expressionist style was a major influence on the American horror genre, but […]

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