The Golden Age of Hollywood

A companion thread to my "What's the Last DVD You Purchased?" thread. I thought it might be fun to discuss what we all are watching or have recently watched. Below will be my first post in this thread.

Kevin

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I'm trying to decide what movie to put on. I'm in the mood for a comedy, but I don't want one that's too silly. I want something with heart.

I miss my GAOH friends!

Did you decide? I missed this too but I've been so busy! How about Holiday? It's one of my favorites and does have some good heart. Yes, I feel like rewatching it right now!

Holiday is a wonderful film. It's my favorite of the four Hepburn-Grant pairings and one of my three or four favorite Hepburn films. I first saw it in the theater, oddly enough. This was before my classic film obsession took hold of me, and it's one of the factors that drew me in that direction. It was a wonderful experience seeing this movie on the big screen with friends. I love the scene in the playroom where the characters are acting like kids. This pointed out the difference between Grant's and Hepburn's characters (and his friends Mr. and Mrs. Potter) and the rest of the Seton family, and gave a foreshadowing that Grant and Hepburn were meant to end up together.
I ended up watching a movie I borrowed from the library -- Chocolat. I enjoyed it, but it's not one I feel I need to own. There are so many newer films I haven't seen that I'd like to. I still haven't seen The Martian, The Black Swan, and countless others. Basically, if it came out after 2009 I probably haven't seen it. Not that I avoid newer movies, I just don't get to the theater that often, I don't have a movie channel, and I don't have Netflix.
I also borrowed The 100-Foot Journey, which is about two very different restaurants 100 feet apart from each other. It stars Helen Mirren. I'm looking forward to watching it.

I watched the 7 Faces of Dr. Lao with Tony Randall. It's a fantasy film by George Pal with a big heart. Randall is fabulous as he plays most of the characters in the film. It has a sweet and timeless message. If you're young or just young at heart I think you would enjoy this film.

I have this movie and love it! I love Randall's performance, too, and Barbara Eden is stunningly beautiful in it. I love the scene she does with the god Pan. Maybe I will rewatch this soon. It has been a while. Thanks for the recommendation, Kevin!

I enjoyed watching The Hundred-Foot Journey last night. It was much more romantic than I was expecting, and the cinematography was gorgeous. I'll have to look it up and see if it won anything for cinematography.

Now I have my nightly dilemma of wondering what to watch. I worked really hard today, so I feel I deserve to indulge myself now. It should be something a little obscure that I haven't seen in a while, or maybe even a non-comedy.

Yes, I'm wondering where I could possibly go after my comedy of the week, too... perhaps good time for some horror after all? 

Yes, do it! Halloween is almost here! They're showing Frankenstein at the Tampa Theatre on Saturday afternoon here. That would be so fun, but I can't do it, unfortunately.

I sat behind a young lady at church this last week who had a severe cold and so naturally I got it. So, spent the day at home sick. Ugh!

Anyway, Laurie and I watched several films on TCM. All of which we have seen before but had been a while. One was Ivanhoe (1952) with Robert Taylor, Joan Fontaine, Elizabeth Taylor and George Sanders and the antagonist. I seem to recall not liking this movie the first time I had seen it but found it much more enjoyable this time around. The costumes and scenery in the castles are splendid and the scene of the siege of the keep was especially well done. Sanders was also great as De Bois-Guilbert who was determined to have Rebecca, played by Liz Taylor, and destroy Ivanhoe, played by Robert Taylor. I thought Guy Rolf, who played Prince John was also exceptional. The simple plot revolves around Ivanhoe's quest to raise enough money to pay the ransom of King Richard the Lion-hearted and being thwarted by Prince John and his minions. If you like period films you will probably enjoy it. Certainly, a must-see for fans of the stars.

Also, watched the Alfred Hitchcock thriller Suspicion (1941) with Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine. Although one of Hitchcock's early films it is certainly a film worth seeing at least once. His directing is always a treat to watch. I particularly loved the ending ****SPOILER**** The final scene when Grant and Fontaine get back into the car and drive off Grant pouts his arm around her and Hitch allows the viewer to interpret how things work out. Did Grant's character pull his final scheme over on his wife and intends to use the poison that can't be traced to kill her off anyway or do they really work things out and live happily ever after? Hmmm....

Finally, we also watched Doctor Zhivago (1965) with Omar Sharif. I don't have time to go into detail about this film but I will say that the film is beautifully photographed and well acted. The story at times though is downright confusing and hard to follow. It's also a depressing film and so anyone looking for something uplifting and hopeful shouldn't look here. Although it is a love story it is one filled with tragedy. 

Anyway, I'm still sick today and will probably watch some more TCM to while away the hours.

Kevin

Was it Joan Fontaine day at TCM? I hope you feel better soon, Kevin. My day was also not the best. Both my pool pump motor and my phone died today. Large, unexpected expense and time and trouble...
So tonight I'm sitting around wondering what movie to watch, as usual, and it needs to be uplifting and hopeful!

This week I went from Thirteen Women to The Mask of Fu Manchu. No masterpieces by any means but solid and enjoyable, obscure in a 1932 kind of way. More than anything I was watching Myrna Loy and trying to figure out how she went from those parts to, well pretty much everything from the following year onwards. What a way to turn your career around, hats off to a wonderful actress and beautiful lady. I'll probably keep studying some of her work next week.  

Yesterday I watched No More Ladies while finishing up some work. The plot is a little weak (new husband Montgomery is a womanizer by habit, and bride Crawford teaches him that two can play that game), but it was really fun to see Joan Crawford, Robert Montgomery, Franchot Tone, Charles Ruggles, Gail Patrick, and ESPECIALLY Edna May Oliver, all in one movie. I love Edna!

Now I'm trying to decide what to put on in the background while I work.

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